Category Archives: Garden

Preventing Trouble In Your Garden Before It Starts.

Many different troubles are likely to occur in your garden. That is reality. The nature of the plant is significant here, some hardy shrubs might stay trouble free all their lives, an old-fashioned Rose might be host to an assortment of pests and diseases every season. The weather is another basic factor, there will be slugs when it’s wet, greenfly when it is dry, frost damage when it’s cold and red spider mite when it’s hot. So both expert and novice gardeners can expect problems.

The big difference is that the expert knows what to look for, takes steps to cut down the likelihood of pest and disease attack, and tackles trouble the moment it appears. Garden troubles are tackled in two basic ways, culturally and chemically. One method cannot replace the other, they both have their job to do in a well-tended garden.

Pruning properly:

You must learn this indispensable art. It is obviously essential for ensuring fruit and flower production, but it is also essential in the war against pests and diseases. Cut out dead wood. Remove congested branches to ensure adequate exposure to air. Paint large cuts with Arbrex.

Choose wisely when buying plants:

Reject soft bulbs, lanky bedding plants, aged seeds, unhealthy looking shrubs and disease-ridden perennials.

Plan carefully:

Be certain that your plant is right for your site. Avoid sun loving plants if shade is an issue – avoid tender plants if the garden is open and susceptible to frosts. Rotation of crops is also important for a lot of vegetables.

Spray to avoid disease:

Fungicides tend to be protectors rather than cures. This means you should spray as soon as the first spots are seen. In some cases (e.g black spot, peach leaf curl) you are required to spray before the disease is seen.

Remove dead plants, rubbish and weeds:

Rotting plants can often be a source of infection, some actually attract pests into your garden. Boxes, old flower pots etc are a breeding ground for slugs and woodlice. Weeds rob plants of food, water, light and space. Hoe them out or pull them out – take care if you use a weedkiller.

Guard against animals:

Use netting to safeguard seedlings, vegetables and soft fruit from birds. A cylinder of wire-netting all around the trunk base is the best way to keep squirrels, rabbits, cats and dogs far away from the bottom of trees.

Always follow the rules of excellent cleanliness under glass:

The humid environment in your greenhouse is a paradise for pests and diseases. Control is often difficult, so again, prevention is better than cure. Use compost or sterilized soil when planting. Ensure the house is adequately ventilated; dry air encourages pests and poor growth, saturated air encourages diseases. Try to avoid sudden fluctuations in temperature; water regularly. Water during the morning, although you can water in the early evening if the weather is warm. Remove dead leaves and plants without delay.

Feeding your plants properly:

Shortages of nutrients often leads to numerous problems, poor growth, undersized blooms, lowered disease resistance and discolored leaves. But take care, overfeeding can cause scorch, and unbalanced feeding with too much nitrogen can lead to lots of leaves and very few flowers.

Prepare the ground painstakingly:

A strong-growing plant is more likely to resist pest or disease attack than a weak specimen. Water-logging as a result of insufficient soil preparation is a basic cause of plant failure in heavy soils. Add a humus maker when digging. Remove perennial weed roots. Add Chlorophos to the soil if pests have gnawed roots in a different place in your garden.

Easy Steps to Grow Your Own Vegetable Garden

If you are a hobby gardener, you may be dreaming about fresh organic vegetables. It is easier than it seems with a few simple steps. I discovered that vegetable gardening requires good planning and proper preparation for a successful harvest.

Step 1 – Bed and border planning: Whether squash, tomatoes or lettuce, healthy plants have needs. Since most vegetables need a sheltered and sunny spot, growing them in the shade will be a futile effort. The size of the vegetable garden patch depends on the total size of the garden, and what vegetables you want to grow. Radishes or carrots grow well in a confined space. Significantly more space is required for potatoes, squash and cabbage. Draw a scaled plan of the bed and lay out which plants grow where. The single bed should be no wider than 130 inches to keep the center of the bed from both sides within easy reach. Enclosing the bed creates visual clarity and prevents rain from washing away the fertile topsoil. This can be done using weather resistant wood planks of larch, oak, frost-resistant bricks or natural stones. If you typically have a lot of snails in the garden, you may want to consider a special snail guard.

Step2 – Preparing the soil: Before it goes to seeding or planting, you need to prepare the ground. Use a garden claw to loosen up soil or mix existing dirt with nutritious top soil. You can spread a few bags of flower and vegetable topsoil on the bed. This will provide proper nutrition and good plant growth. In order to improve the nutrient content of the soil, you can also incorporate fertilizer. When in doubt conduct a pH test of the soil to avoid over-fertilizing. You can get pH test strips or a soil tester at your local garden center.

Step 3 – Make sure you have good neighbors: Not all vegetables get along. For example, onions should not be planted next to green beans or cabbage. Tomatoes will grow well next to cabbage, lettuce, spinach, parsley, and celery. You can buy seeds or small plants to start your own vegetable garden. Established plants are sometimes easier for gardening newcomers. Sow or plant the vegetables in rows spaced wide enough apart to facilitate later maintenance of the bed. Keep in mind that some vegetables like green beans or tomatoes require a trellis.

Step 4 – Cultivate and harvest: If you plant early in the spring and the weather is still cool, cover the freshly planted and sown vegetables to protect them from frost damage. Otherwise, a vegetable is very easy to maintain. If there is no rain, just water once daily and remove the weeds in between. With a little patience and depending on your region, your own fresh vegetables can be harvested in mid to late summer. When the season is over and you want to use your vegetable patch in the next year again, it is important to give the new soil nutrients. For example, old humus from the compost is ideal for mixing the existing soil.

For more helpful tips and guides on vegetable gardening visit the Gardening Palace at:

How to choose Rattan Garden Furniture

Outdoor and indoor rattan furniture is by far one of the best types of furniture you can use in your garden, conservatory or patio area. The best part is rattan furniture is available in a massive range of styles, from the traditional dining sets to the most modern styles including outdoor sofa sets and day beds, so there is a great choice to meet everyone’s needs.

Rattan is the name given for nearly 600 species of palms native to tropical regions of Africa, Asia, and Australasia. Rattan is a type of long vine that matures in tropical parts of the world. To manufacture furniture from this tree, rattan canes are cut and split into manageable sections and then are taken through a process of steaming in order to make them soft and pliable for manipulating into the required shapes and sizes to produce the outdoor furniture we have come to know and love in the U.K.

Traditionally, some of the best types of rattan garden furniture produced have frames made of solid teak with weaves of rattan wrapped around to give it an authentic look. This combination is very durable and hardy, particularly in warm climates or in environments similar to where rattan grows naturally. The new adaptation of this type of manufacturing has replaced the solid teak frame with a powder coated rust resistant aluminium frame which is more suitable for climate like the U.K.

Rattan is very easy to maintain and unlike hardwood and softwood garden furniture sets, rattan furniture does not require oiling, moisturizing or sanding down. Rattan retains its shape, colour, and strength for several years. Cleaning is very simple, any dust or dirt can be easily washed off with a hose pipe or power washer. For any minor cleaning that is required, wiping it with a damp cloth will more than suffice. One of Rattans main qualities is its ability to withstand the earths natural elements, which makes it highly suitable for outdoor use.

Rattan is lightweight and very strong, making it ideal for rough use. The soft texture of Rattan even means that children are safe around rattan furniture. Rattan garden furniture is very cost effective and economical as is tends to be cheaper than solid wood garden furniture and it has a much longer life span.

When looking to purchase rattan outdoor furniture, look for some of the following things relating to the piece you may be interested in. The larger the diameter of the rattan stem will mean it is better quality. A size of 1 inch in diameter would suggest an adequately sturdy stem and will provide a quality piece of furniture. Rattan should be smooth in texture and devoid of hair like strands sticking out from the piece.

Rattan is graded A, B, and C. Grade A is the best quality and will have a smooth texture and similar colour all over. Rattan which is classified as Grade B will have a slightly rougher surface. Grade C Rattan will have a particularly rough surface, and has minor defects and splits in the strands used to make the furniture. Only purchase rattan garden furniture from reputable dealers and suppliers who offer you warranty with your purchase. You should expect a minimum of 12 months manufacturers warranty on your purchase

If you follow the advice above you can have peace of mind that you will get quality piece rattan garden furniture.

House Plant Care – Insect Control in Garden Fruit Plantings

Growing fruit in the home garden can be an interesting, fun and rewarding hobby. This does not happen without a great deal of work. House plant care can be very easy with a few tips to keep them healthy.
Control of pests (diseases and insects) is an integral part of the care necessary to obtain good results. Insect infestations reduce yields and lower the quality of harvested garden vegetables and home fruit plantings. All plant parts may be injured by insects. Some insects bore into roots, seeds or stems. Others destroy crops by chewing on the succulent foliage, stems or fruits. Plant diseases are carried by certain insects. Control can be maintained all season by a combination of cultural practices, mechanical control, biological control and chemical applications.
Cultural practices such as pruning, sanitation, variety selection and selecting open, sites for planting are necessary for good pest control.

How to Use the Spray Schedules

Most fungicide (disease control product) and some insecticide (insect control product) applications are effective only if applied preventatively. The timing of these preventive sprays is based on the growth stage of the plant and forms the foundation of the spray charts that follow. In very rainy seasons, sprays may need to be applied more frequently than the schedule given in the following charts. Wet weather favors development of the disease causing organisms and more chemical protection is needed. Also, rains can wash off the fungicides and insecticides. When rain occurs before a spray has dried or if rainfall totals more than 1 inch within 24 hours, the spray should be re-applied. Fungicides provide more benefit when applied before a rain than after, because protection from infection by disease-causing organisms is needed when plant surfaces are wet.

Additional Spray Tips

One of the biggest mistakes home fruit growers make is to allow their trees to grow too tall. If trees are maintained at a manageable height, it is easier to spray them properly, as well as to harvest the fruit. Proper pruning practices reduce the amount of spray needed and permit better coverage. The type of sprayer used depends on the size of the fruit planting. For most plantings of small fruits or for a few small fruit trees, pump-up sprayers are adequate. Trombone-type sprayers are helpful for taller trees. For the increased spray volumes required by larger home orchards, power sprayers are recommended. Honey bees and other pollinating insects must be protected from insecticides, which will kill them. Do not spray fruit plants with insecticides while the plants are in bloom.

Pesticide Safety

Most of the pesticides suggested for use are low-toxicity materials. However, some precautions are needed:
Keep pesticides in the original, labeled container.
Keep pesticides in a locked storage cabinet, away from children or pets.
Read the label each time before you use the product.
Wear rubber gloves, goggles, a long-sleeved shirt, long pants and a hat when mixing and applying pesticides. Refer to the label for required protective gear.
Handle the pesticide carefully when mixing. Avoid breathing dust or vapors. Wash any chemicals off the skin immediately with plenty of water.
Never apply insecticides and fungicides with a sprayer that has been used for weed killers.
Do not spray if it is windy.
Mix only as much as you need. Do not store diluted spray mixtures from one application to the next. They will lose effectiveness and are unsafe.

Multipurpose Fruit Spray

Growers with small fruit plantings may want to consider multipurpose fruit spray products. These materials are widely available, convenient and will serve most pest control purposes. They are mixtures containing a fungicide (captan), and usually two insecticides (malathion and methoxychlor). Multipurpose sprays are produced by several companies and sold under names such as Home Orchard Spray 7, Tree Fruit Spray, All Purpose Fruit Spray7, General Purpose Fruit Spray7 and others. Certain brands contain an additional insecticide, carbaryl (Sevin). Mixtures containing carbaryl should not be applied to apple or pear until 21 days after petal fall, as it causes the fruit to drop.

Sanitation and Cultural Practices

APPLE AND PEAR
Apple and pear trees are subject to serious damage from pests. The following practices will improve the effectiveness of the pesticides and may lessen the need for sprays.
Plant disease-resistant varieties. Varieties resistant to cedar-apple rust, scab and powdery mildew are also available.
Rake and destroy leaves in the fall, if apple scab, pear scab or pear leaf spot are problems. The organisms that cause these diseases overwinter in infected leaves.
For cedar-apple rust control, elimination of the source of spores – cedar trees – is effective but not always possible. Removal of the galls caused by the fungus on cedar trees is helpful. Pruning trees according to recommendations improves control of all ground diseases. In well-pruned trees, air circulation and sunlight penetration are improved. This helps control diseases by promoting rapid drying after rains and dew. Penetration of sprays into the canopy is also better if the trees are well-pruned.
Prune out and destroy all dead or diseased shoots and limbs during the dormant season. This helps reduce fire blight, fruit rots and certain leaf spots, as the organisms that cause these diseases overwinter in the wood.
PEACH, PLUM AND CHERRY
Peach, plum, cherry and other stone fruits are commonly affected by serious pest problems and, as a result, a conscientious spray program is needed. The following sanitation and cultural practices will improve the chances of success and may lessen the need for sprays.
Prune trees according to recommendations, to allow better air circulation and sunlight penetration. This helps control diseases by promoting rapid drying after rains and dew. Penetration of sprays into the canopy is also better if the trees are well-pruned.
Remove the overwintering structure for the brown rot fungus, old mummified fruit left hanging in the tree or on the ground.
Control of black knot of plum and cherry is dependent on removal of the knots before they begin to produce spores. In late winter, prune out and destroy these rough, black swellings or tumors that develop on limbs and twigs.
Avoid planting peach varieties that are highly susceptible to bacterial leaf spot. Examples are Elberta, Halehaven, Rio- Oso-Gem and Sunhigh. Chemical control of this disease is very limited.
GRAPE
Most home grape plantings will require a preventive schedule of pesticides, since certain pests such as black rot can completely destroy a crop of fruit. However, the following sanitation and cultural practices will reduce the need for pesticides.
Keep vines well-pruned according to recommendations, to prevent overgrowth of vines and dense canopy. Pruning promotes air circulation and sunlight penetration, thus more rapid drying after rains and dew. Penetration of sprays into the foliar canopy is also better if the vines are well-pruned.
Remove mummified berries (shriveled, dry, raisin-like). Clusters on the vines as well as those that have fallen to the ground should be removed. Also, destroy infected canes that have been pruned off. For control of grape root borer, mounding soil makes it difficult for larvae to reach the roots or adults to emerge. Mound some soil 1 foot high for 12 feet around each vine between early and mid-June.
STRAWBERRY
An intensive, preventive spray program is generally not needed on strawberry. Treatments can usually be made on an as-needed basis. The following sanitation and cultural practices will reduce the need for pesticides.

Bed renovation immediately after harvest is crucial to managing pest problems. Renovation involves narrowing rows, mowing leaves, removing weeds and fertilization. Rake and destroy cut-off leaves and stems after renovation.
Maintain narrow rows throughout the growing season (maximum 18 inches wide), to maintain good sunlight and air penetration of the canopy. This provides good berry formation and rapid drying after rains and dew.
Plant varieties with resistance to red stele and leaf spot. Where anthracnose is a problem, consider the resistant varieties Delmarvel and Sweet Charlie.
Control weeds throughout the growing season. Weeds increase disease by shading the plants and by interfering with air circulation. Weeds also harbor many insect and mite pests.
Mulch with straw before berries begin to lie on the ground, to reduce gray mold and leather rot (fruit rots).

Safe Handling of Insecticides

Home gardeners can control insect pests with reasonable safety by observing these safety rules:
Keep insecticides in the original, labeled container.
Keep insecticides in a locked storage container.
Read the label each time you use the insecticide.
Measure the amount to be mixed carefully.
Do not exceed the recommended rate of application.
Handle the insecticide carefully when mixing to avoid splashing of liquid concentrates and billowing of dusts and powders.
Wear protective clothing and other personal protective equipment as dictated by the label.
To protect yourself when mixing insecticides, it is suggested that protective clothing and equipment, such as chemical-resistant gloves, a long-sleeved shirt, long pants and protective eyewear, be worn.
Wash all insecticides off the skin immediately, using plenty of soap and water.
Avoid breathing the spray mist or vapor.
Always mix insecticides outdoors near a source of water.
Clean up any spilled materials to prevent children from entering a heavily contaminated area.
Apply insecticides to only those plants listed on the label.
Observe the time intervals between the last application and harvest.

The severity and type of pest problems on garden vegetables usually vary considerably from year to year. During most growing seasons, consistent production of high quality vegetables is assured only with the use of pesticides for insect control. This is not to suggest that vegetables cannot be grown without pesticides by using nonchemical methods, but it will usually take more effort on the part of the gardener.

For the best garden ever consider Aquaponics

Growing your own crops is undeniably a demanding task even for those deeply in love with gardening. It certainly is a time intensive activity and it requires plenty of energy and dedication. Furthermore, a conventional garden requires fertile land which will sustain your crops. These are generally the main causes for which many people give up their desire to growing their own personal vegetables and switching to home grown organic food. What people dont generally know is that there is a method of growing organic food (pesticide and chemical free) in the comfort of your home. Yes, you read it perfectly: inside of your house.

This new type of farming is called aquaponics and is the simplest way to become a farmer! The great part is that you’ll not only grow vegetables, but you will also grow fish, with the intention to offer your friends and family a diversified nutrition. It all starts fairly simple, with a plain tank filled with water wherein you place some fish. You can get for Tilapia, Chinese Catfish, Crappie, Bluegill or Koi, or whatever species of fish you are allowed to grow in your house. Put them in the water, take good care of them and in about a month position the seeds ensuring they can reach the water and get the nutrients from it. The plants will develop and begin growing using the nutrients offered by the fish. Meanwhile, the fish will enjoy a clean environment as the plants will act as “maids” to them, cleaning and refreshing their water each and every day.

As you can tell this type of farming does not require any type of land, fertilizers or harmful chemicals. Just set up the system and make sure that the water has got the normal PH so that the fish will live comfortably in there. Then, let nature follow its course!

You can grow almost everything you need in the aquaponic farming. Leafy greens, fruity plants and legumes can all be planted within the aquaponic farming. If you have a piece of land where you might cultivate ground-based plants (potatoes, carrots, asparagus, onions, garlic and so on) you can use this water to irrigate it and the results will be spectacular!

This symbiosis between fish and plants is the one which will save you lots of time as well as provides you with a way to take on this activity without compromising your social or professional life. Couple of moments each day will be sufficient for you to make sure that both your crops and your fish are alright! In fact, growing plants and fish with the aquaponic system is so simple that your entire family will be happy to help you with that. Since it involves no dirty hands, bending and digging in the ground, you can even let your little ones help you. It won’t take long so that they won’t get bored and you will get to enjoy moments with them.

Aquaponics is the easiest way through which you will have tasty, fresh and healthy vegetables on your table everyday. There is no need to be afraid. Its easy.

History of the Small Garden

Where space is restricted, the design of that space becomes all-important. A brief look at the garden in history still has relevance for the owners of small gardens today, even though the terms of reference were often quite different. Many of the elements which make up the design of todays small garden have historical antecedents, while the number of old gardens which actually remain indicates that they have stood the test of time visually and as places for use.

In its earliest from the garden was basically an enclosure, made of thorn or scrub, to keep out marauding animals and keep in domestic ones. The enclosures later took the form of a mud wall, and were a defence against other humans as much as animals or were intended to shield off the heat of the sun. When nomadic community settled, the enclosures because places for growing both food and plants. This creation of a small private sanctuary characterized early enclosed gardens all over the world, though there function of course varied according to the climate and the way of life.

Early Formal Gardens

The earliest recorded gardens seen in Egypt seen in 3000-BC, were surrounded by a mud wall to absorb some of the suns heat. The house was also within this square or rectangular enclosure. The formal layout of early gardens was necessitated by the need for irrigation channels to provide water in a hot, dry climate. These divided the garden into geometric areas and, in the grander gardeners, the irrigation channels became formal pools with fish and there were arbours to sit under, overhung with vines, and shade giving palms. The Egyptians grew onions, which were there staple diet, and other vegetables and herbs for their medicinal value.

This basically formal style of garden characterized the whole Islamic world during the next few thousand years. The enclosed paradise gardens of Persia were often walled and the walls hung with grapevines and climbers. Fruit trees were cultivated, including peach, apple, cherry, banana, date, fig and olive. The Persians also grew flowers such as poppys, lilies, chrysanthemums, narcissi and roses in formal beds between the stylized cruciform shapes of the water canals. The idea of a flowering paradise within a formal setting is captures in Persia writings, painted miniatures and woven into carpet patterns.

The Indian and later the Moorish garden evolved from the Persian glorieta. Water was the essential thread of continuity, weaving through and links different plating areas, while creating a cooling effect. The Moorish influence stretched along the whole of North Africa, into Sicily and to southern Italy and thence to the Sierra Nevada in southern Spain. The style and form of the garden remained much the same, enclosed by buildings and high walls to provide shade and privacy. They were designed for outdoor living while remaining within the confines of the house.

The Moorish garden in Spain generally consisted of several court yards, known as patios, with water as the connecting link. Many patios contained a long canal with a central fountain and there were ornate pillars and tiled walls and floors. Cypress and orange trees were planted in sunken beds and usually lines the walls to give extra shade, while aromatic plants were grown in pots along the edge of the water scented the air. From Spain, where even the grand palace gardens were divided into small walled enclosures, the paradise garden tradition can be traced to South America. From there is spread to the idyllic climate of California, where it eventually metamorphosed in to todays patio garden, with the element of water often present in the blue waters of the swimming pool.

FormBoss Metal Garden Edging

FormBoss Metal Garden Edging is Strong and Resilient, nevertheless Adaptable enough prior to set up to let you to Develop any shape you want!

FormBoss Metal Garden Edging is risk-free with its rounded leading lip from 4.5mm to 7.5mm width, and all stakes and connectors are hidden underneath this lip. The best lip is also what permits you to develop sharp bends without having any sharp edges because there’s no need to have to minimize and join, just bend the edging and get pleasure from the strength and smoothness of a continuous edge. Smooth curves are uncomplicated to produce and the edging bends just as uncomplicated with the lip on the inside or outdoors a curve. We can also make you tree rings to any size you want.nt.

FormBoss Metal Garden Edging arrives in a large collection of heights and gauges to suit any edging require, from flush defining lines to 500mm retaining walls. From excellent price residential grade of one.2mm to heavy duty industrial grade of two.5mm gauge. In order to help the edge we’ve formulated a big collection of special stakes and connectors to support and connect it without interfering with all those clear uninterrupted lines and clear front faces and best lip that your garden deserves.

FormBoss Metal Garden Edgingis offered in our at any time preferred Galvanised version, or Stainless steel for harshest of environments, and we now also offer an distinctive Corten edition that offers you that great organic rusty texture with a lifespan of up to four instances as lengthy as regular gentle steel, and it does not rub off brown as regular mild steel does.

FormBoss Metal Garden Edging comes in helpful lengths or 2.44m that make it easy to do the job with, and it also allows us to get the edging to you in an efficient way. And with our wise connectors becoming a member of is a breeze, and leaves you with almost invisible joint.

FormBoss Metal Garden Edging is offered Australia wide, and if we don’t have a stockist in the vicinity of you we supply rapidly and at incredibly competitive freight costs, from Croydon, Victoria.

FormBoss Metal Garden Edging is an completely Australian produced and owned merchandise.

Specially made for optimum final results.

* Easy design and style and uncomplicated to install, no specific resources necessary
* Heights available: 75mm, 100mm, and 150mm, 185mm, 230mm, 290mm, 390mm and 580mm.
* FormBoss is designed from 1.2mm, 1.6mm, or 2mm mild steel (2.5mm gauge by request)
* FormBoss comes with a 4.5mm, 5.5mm or 6.5mm best safety edge dependent on your gauge.
* Offered in three distinct finishes including galvanized, basic (rusty), or stainless steel.

Please inquire us if you would like us to suggest an installer in your location.
For a swift response to your enquiry call 1300 307 542, 7:30 – 5:00pm Monday – Saturday, or e-mail

Greenlines Gardenware specialises in only one product, theFormBoss Metal Garden Edging system. We do this so we can remain experts in our field.

Our Mission is “Excellence in customer care and value for money”

As founder and owner of Greenlines Gardenware, Gerry Boerlage, brings twenty years experience in the fields of both commercial horticulture and boiler welding.

After extensive R&D and prototyping for the simplest and best solution I came up with the new innovative metal edging system FormBoss, because there’s been a hole in the market for this product for too long.

In the mean time my son Bradley and Toby have joined the sales team. Toby is an engineer and very capable on 3D Cad and we all know the right advice to
give you wether you need a few tips while installing on the day or you need customised advice on a landscape designers Cad drawing we can certainly help.

We at Greenlines strongly believe in “what comes around goes around” (Karma) and put all our efforts into delivering a product along with great service that delivers a new up market alternative to other methods of edging that’s out there now.

Wherever you are in Australia, from sales to final installation, we are here to support you and bring out the best in your project 7 days a week.

Thank you for visiting our Greenlines site and your interest in creating better outdoor areas.

London Garden Design

London Garden Design
Designs in London have to take into consideration a number of factors. As with any other gardens outside of London, the size and function of the garden has to be considered. What must also be taken into consideration is that though there are a variety of gardens in London from large to small, from courtyard to front garden, from roof garden to balcony garden they are all surrounded by the city, itself. This means that the majority of London gardens are affected by limited sunlight, particular soils and the surrounding buildings and neighbouring gardens. London gardens are surrounded by the city and it is difficult to merge them into the landscape (although there are good views from some gardens) and they are usually enclosed and shut off from the city and its surroundings.

Designing a Sanctuary
Enclosed gardens in London are popularly regarded as a retreat, a haven, a sanctuary away from the hustle and bustle of the busy city. It is perceived that they should be separate from the city and rather than reflect London occupy a quiet space that contains qualities the city does not appear to possess.

One way in which to create a sanctuary in London is to create an exotic garden. This is done through clever plantation strategy. Ornamental rather than vegetable plantation will create a scene of colour. This can be done with a variety of gardens from rock garden to formal flower gardens. Rock gardens are best suited to courtyard or at least ground level gardens. It is unlikely that the garden will have a natural rock formation in London so it is best to consult a professional designer about creating an artificial formation as these can be a complex creation. Flower gardens are usually informal in the country as there is greater access to wild plantation which gardens may even blend in with and extend the garden. A formal flower garden in London will bring it colour and life and carefully chosen plants will ensure colour in all seasons.

Container Gardens
Container gardens also work well in London areas in roof gardens and balconies. Containers of plants can look cheap and messy but carefully chosen plants, stylish containers and complementary features can make a garden very attractive. Herb gardens also work well in container gardens and flower gardens as they are functional and add interesting scents. Garden designers can now provide and install features for container gardens such as a water feature in a trough to be placed on a roof garden. This type of garden design is ideal for roof gardens and balconies as the materials used to create the garden need to be light and feasibly moved to a roof or balcony.

Water Water Everywhere
Water designs are very popular as they can both provide a garden of peace and tranquillity and add some exoticism. Persian gardens, for example, traditionally use water features for irrigation, display and sound. These water features can easily be replicated and reproduced in modern gardens. Water designs are ideal for London gardens as they inspire a place of quiet reflection away from the loud and cluttered city. There are a range of water features to choose from. Ponds work well in ground level gardens but need to be carefully located away from child’s play areas and the sizing needs to be very accurate as it is difficult to change once completed. Water features like ponds can also be functional as seating can be incorporated into this (and other fixtures) with the addition of a wide brim making effective use of space. However if the garden is not suited to a pond, fountains, mists and pools are amongst a wide range of water features to choose from. It is now possible to have a water garden anywhere as there are a large number of materials available to construct them. Water pumps, sand, pebbles, hoses, cement, reservoir tank, stone, spirit level and tile are the types of construction material used to create the feature. Garden designers can both advise on the use of such material and also install water gardens. Once the water feature is installed it requires little maintenance creating a lasting impression that does not fade upon completion.

Let There Be Light
What is also key to a garden in London, regardless of planting design and features is the creation of light. Most gardens in London are naturally overshadowed by the surrounding conglomerate of buildings. It is important to introduce light and colour into these gardens to make them look good. This can be done through the painting of the fencing and fixtures in either bold, strong colours or in light colours which artificially enhances the brightness of the garden and can be applied to any type of London garden. Fixtures and fencing are also easily supplied if not already in place and there are a range of designs from stone, fencing, iron railings, hurdling, wood and hedges that can be sourced and used.

In addition to painted fixtures the garden can be lighted artificially through the use of electric lighting. It is important to involve professionals in the installation of garden lighting as it must be protected from water used for plant irrigation and can cause enormous expense if not done properly. It is recommended that ordinary bulbs are not used but solar bulbs and lights chosen from a range of garden lighting. It is also important to remember to ensure the garden does not resemble Christmas all year around and that lighting is effectively used to highlight. Lights for occasional use such as oil lamps for visitors can be used in conjunction with permanent lighting for entertainment purposes.

Lightening and brightening a London garden and creating a luxurious yet tranquil space in the City will create a good London garden

Tips For Buying Wooden Garden Furniture

Wooden garden furniture can add a touch of class and elegance to your home. You just have to make sure that you choose the right type of garden furniture. It should go well with the dcor of your home, withstand the climatic conditions of your area, and meet your requirements.

Here we discuss some tips for buying wooden garden furniture.

Decide the Type of Wood You Want

Wooden garden furniture sets are available in different types of wood like teak, cedar, mahogany, eucalyptus, oak, pine, and bamboo. If you want something that can withstand rough weather conditions and last longer, you should choose teak. Teak furniture requires minimal maintenance and is resistant to moulds and termites. But, it is expensive. Eucalyptus is another good choice for outdoor furniture. It is sturdy and looks great in natural finish. Pine garden furniture is aesthetically beautiful, but can get damaged easily if kept in sun or rain for long. Cedar outdoor garden furniture is quite popular. It does not warp and split with ageing. Moreover, it is resistant to insects. Whichever wood you choose, you should ensure that you cover your furniture when not in use. Paint it regularly to keep it looking new for years.

Decide the Purpose Of Buying Furniture

If you want furniture just for relaxing and spending some time with your family and friends in garden, you could think of a small table with a few chairs. If you intend to throw garden parties, you will need huge benches and tables that can comfortably accommodate your guests as well as food. For those who love reading and soaking in sun outdoors, a lounge chair or comfortable sofa is perfect.

Measure the Space Available For Furniture

Before you go shopping for your furniture, you should measure the space available for it. Avoid overcrowding your garden area with over-sized tables, armchairs, and swings. You should leave adequate space for people to move around. If you have limited space, you should choose space-saving furniture items like folding chairs.

Decide What Style You Want

Wooden garden furniture is available in different styles like traditional and contemporary. You should choose a style that complements your garden area and also the dcor of the rest of your home. For instance, for giving a wooded ambience to your garden, you should choose from teak furniture in traditional styles. But if you want to give trendy look to your garden area, you should choose from contemporary styles that are sleek and classy.

Before you invest in outdoor garden furniture, you should properly assess your requirements. This will help you in selecting the right outdoor furniture. Apart from paying attention to style, size, and wood, you should also check how durable the furniture is and how much maintenance it would require.

Nowadays, you can buy wooden garden furniture and patio furniture through online stores. Not only they offer good quality products at reasonable rates, but also have a wide range to suit different needs and tastes. Before placing your order, you should always check the shipping costs, delivery time, and return and exchange policy of the online dealer.

Designing A Suburban Garden – A Brief Introduction

Some people relish the thought of designing a garden whereas others will go running straight to the yellow pages. If you have just purchased your new home and the garden needs some attention, there are a few basic design principles that should help whether you choose to do the work yourself or to engage a professional.

Most people who decide to redesign their garden have a general idea as to what they want it to do and how they want it to look when finished. What they don’t necessarily have is the experience to produce a detailed drawing or to do the actual work. Often the initial design is quite simple and a lot of people stop there however with the help of a professional designer and a little bit of imagination it is amazing how easily you can transform your garden into your own personal idea of paradise.

Your garden’s function

The first stage in designing any garden is to decide what its function will be when finished. If you have children then you might want a large lawn where they can play in safety or a patio area where they can have a playhouse. Pets, and in particular dogs will also need somewhere to run and so again a lawn may be beneficial. If you have an adult-only household however then there are many more options available and you can turn your garden into the perfect place for entertaining or into a tranquil haven depending on your tastes, simply by adding decking, a seating area, ornamental structures, a small pond and a water feature or perhaps gravel walkways that wind throughout the garden.

Choosing the plants and structures

Once you have decided exactly what general layout you want in your finished garden, then you can actually start to design it. You will need to consider the amount of space you have available and try to make the most of it by planning what structures you want and where they will be placed. It is at this stage that a professional designer could well be an advantage as they will be able to make suggestions that you would never have thought of and the little details they bring to the design might make all the difference.

You will also need to choose a colour scheme for the plants and flowers and which varieties to include. This will depend in no small measure on the type of soil in the garden, where the sun falls during the day and how good the drainage is. In addition it will also be determined by how enthusiastic you are for the ongoing exigencies of gardening. If you like a nice tidy garden but don’t really enjoy or have the time needed to tend it in detail, then it will be worth choosing plants and flowers that that require minimal attention. Some simple research in this area will be beneficial as, again, may the services of a professional designer: they will be able to suggest unusual plant species that will set your new garden apart from others — and they will also know where best to buy them.

Larger suburban gardens may need additional trees and shrubs to fill out the borders or break up an expanse of lawn. Alternatively you can add extra flower beds or perhaps another seating area. It is important that you don’t leave large portions of the garden looking bare in the longer term but it is equally important that you don’t overstock the garden. When purchasing plants and shrubs, ensure that you understand their likely size at maturity. You may need to accept a somewhat sparse impression for a while as the plants grow. On this basis, it is sometimes worth the additional expense of acquiring larger, more mature plant stock as part of the mix.

Conclusion

Designing your own garden can be time consuming however it can also be very rewarding, especially when you are sitting out on a warm summer’s evening knowing that the ideas and inspiration were originally yours. Suburban and larger gardens are quite easy to redesign because of their size and you can consider including those features that you have dreamed about for so many years. To get started, all you need to do is put your ideas on paper and go from there.